Kiev – Baikove Cimetery

Baikove Cimetery, Kiev, Ukraine, October 2021

+ La carte

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+ My feelings and historical part

While looking for churches to visit, I came across a site talking about this cemetery. Some of the falls were magnificent. So I decided to go there. A little before arriving, I was treated to the first drops of a little rain for about 2 hours. Because of this rain, I could not walk in this place, as I would have liked. I entered through the 1st door on the left (1st photo). This part is the oldest. Nothing is drawn with a line like in our cemeteries. There is indeed a main alley, but small passages and stairs provide access to the tombs. Then, I went through the main door, a magnificent work to go to the more modern part. A Church is there as well as a good number of statues, as magnificent as the others. The heavier rain forced me to turn around. So I couldn’t go to the crematorium, a really modern building. An other time…
Three things stood out to me, however : the multitude of tombs with statues, as well as representations of people on tombstones, like a drawing. Then, a traditional cross but with another branch across. Finally, the presence of a table and a bench near some graves.
For once, it is better to follow the order of the photos that allow you to walk with me …
Historical part
The cemetery was created in 1833. It takes its name from the nearby Baikovo residence. The oldest part of the cemetery is south of Baikova Street, while most of the cemetery, dating from the 1880s, is north of Baikova Street. It has an Orthodox section, as well as two smaller sections, Catholic and Lutheran. Under the Soviet Union, the intelligentsia and the middle and wealthy classes of Kiev were buried in the Baikove cemetery, hence the multitude of prestigious works. A Byzantine-style Orthodox church was built in the cemetery between 1884 and 1889, with money raised from the sale of the sites.
Source

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+ Linked pages

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+ The cimetery map

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