Kiev – The Transportation

The Transportation, Kiev, Ukraine, October 2021

+ The place

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+ My feelings and historical part

The Metro is truly splendid. Despite the dilapidated condition of some trains (the brakes were noisy once), the metro remains modern as a whole. You can buy a weekly card or pay directly when going through the turnstiles with your credit card. An agent is always present to help you. Unfortunately, English is not widely known in Kiev. The escalators are endless, hence the presence of an agent up and down as well as emergency stops along the route. Due to its depth and the length of the escalators, you will not see many people walking up or down the escalators as is done in Paris … Moreover, do not speak of line numbers but of color: green, red, blue. The stops are well marked in Cyrillic and Roman script, fortunately. Finally, each stop is indicated with its number, as shown in a photo. You can also walk underground to access another line, many undergrounds exist, such as those allowing you to cross the streets of Kiev.
Of course, it’s not just the metro. You have a fairly large bus network. On the other hand, buy your tickets at a terminal, because no sale is made on the buses, except some buses, but which do not seem really linked to the Kiev network. Talking with the controllers is difficult. No English, so a & nbsp; Google Translate & nbsp ;. You can be good, you won’t be fined. There is still a tram network, I still had the impression of being in Varosvie, given the dilapidation. Uber also works very well.
There is also a funéculaire which takes you to the upper town and the lower town.
Historical part
The Kiev metro is renowned in particular for its depth, over 100m (328ft), one of the deepest ever built, its high efficiency (far ahead of the Paris region) as well as for the magnificence of its stations. Most of the metro stations in the former USSR are veritable underground palaces. Inaugurated on November 6, 1960, the Kiev metro was the first rapid public transport network to be built in Ukraine and the third in the USSR, after those in Moscow and Saint Petersburg1. It originally had six stations, all located on metro line 1.
Source

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+ Linked pages

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